Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 8, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

9:00 am
hello, it's wednesday, it's nine o'clock. i'm joanna gosling, welcome to the programme. cracking down on junk food companies — kellogg's and kfc have been forced to remove adverts after one was placed near a school and the other aired during a cartoon. coco pops cronulla, it is so chocolatey! new rules on advertising junk food to under—16s came into effect last year, but are they clear enough, and what impact will they have? we will be finding out. pressure is building on boris johnson over comments he made likening women who wear face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers, with a tory peer now saying he should be kicked out of the party. we will be discussing the row, and what should happen next, with conservative muslims and a tory mp who says the whole thing has been blown out of proportion. and women freezing their eggs so they can have children later in life, is on the rise. this is despite it costing thousands
9:01 am
of pounds. but today, leading obstetricians have issued a warning telling women it cannot always be relied on. figures show using frozen eggs leads to a live birth in just 20% of cases. so, is it time for a cultural shake up to ensure that women don't leave it too late to get pregant? hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. also today, as prince william and theresa mayjoin dignitaries and relatives attending a commemoration service to mark the centenary of the battle of amiens in northern france, we will be finding out why the battle is regarded as a turning point in world war one. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about — use the hashtag victoria live. if you re emailing and are happy for us to contact you 7 and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today...
9:02 am
there's mounting pressure from within the conservative party for borisjohnson to apologise for his comments about burqas and niqabs. in a newspaper column, the former foreign secretary wrote that muslim women who wore the full face veil looked like "letterboxes" or " bank robbers". theresa may has said mrjohnson should say sorry, but others have gone further. the founder of the conservative muslim forum has said he should lose the whip — meaning he would no longer represent the party at westminster. jonathan blake is at westminster. if for ore over these latest remarks by boris johnson? if for ore over these latest remarks by boris johnson? yes, boris johnson may be on holiday but that does not necessarily mean he will be away from the headlines, saying what he did and the way that he did in that column in the daily telegraph on monday has meant he has faced criticism from familiar places, opposition mps, but also some senior
9:03 am
members of his own party. brandon lewis, the conservative party chairman, said yesterday he should apologise. the prime minister said she agreed with him on that. this morning we have said —— card from culture secretaryjeremy morning we have said —— card from culture secretary jeremy wright, morning we have said —— card from culture secretaryjeremy wright, who stopped short of calling on boris johnson to apologise. he said he should have chosen his words more carefully, describing his language as illjudged, pointing out that politicians have a higher responsibility than perhaps we might do if we were discussing this issue with our friends in the do if we were discussing this issue with ourfriends in the pub. that sums up with ourfriends in the pub. that sums up a with ourfriends in the pub. that sums up a lot of the criticism of borisjohnson from sums up a lot of the criticism of boris johnson from within sums up a lot of the criticism of borisjohnson from within the conservative party. it is fair enough to have a discussion about the use of the burqa and whether it should be banned in public, but it is the way in which he chose to do it that as seen him face criticism. there is no indication that boris johnson will be apologising for his comments. friends are defending in
9:04 am
this morning by saying that he is saying what a lot of people are thinking. we will talk more about it later. thank you for now. julian worricker is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. food giants kellogg's and kfc have been forced to remove adverts after one was placed near a school and the other aired during a cartoon. the advertising standards authority found they were promoting foods high in fat, salt and sugar to children. new rules on advertising junk food to under—16s came into effect last year. chi chi izundu reports. these complaints involve some of the biggest names in the food industry. the watchdog upheld two complaints — this kellogg's cereal advert which was shown during a mr bean cartoon, and this kfc ad, which was on a phone box close to a primary school. the advertising standards authority found the companies have broken rules over advertising food high in fat, sugar or salts, to children under 16. there were two upheld rulings against kfc and coco pops granola,
9:05 am
owned by kellogg's, and we are telling them that they cannot repeat those ads. the kfc ads, they have to take down the poster near a school gate. there will be a message that goes out to the companies as well to remind them they will have to take care when placing these ads. the asa dismissed two complaints against mcdonald's. in a statement, kfc apologised, saying their advert outside the school was a total mistake. while kellogg's says they can now advertise on children's tv because it has reduced the sugar in coco pops original by a0%. the children know about it anyway, so they don't need adverts to tell them about it, they already know about those products. i don't think there should be a ban on it, no i don't. i think that us as parents have the right to decide what we give our children or how much amount they take in. health campaigners say one in three children is now overweight or obese by the age of ii and the banning
9:06 am
ofjunk food ads is a start, but much more needs to be done. chi chi izundu, bbc news. a 31—year—old man has been charged with the murder of the rapper sidique kamara, who was stabbed to death in south london last week. mr kamara, also know as incognito, was part of the controversial drill music scene, which is thought to glamorise violence. kenneth umezie is due to appear at bromley magistrates‘ court later today. a petition that could force a by—election in a key seat in northern ireland, and remove the current mp ian paisley, will open later. the dup politician is already suspended over his failure to declare two family holidays paid for by the sri lankan government. he's apologised, but will face a by—election if 10% of his constituents sign the petition. theresa may and prince william will attend a ceremony in northern france to mark the centenary of the battle of amiens — the beginning of the end of world war one.
9:07 am
the duke of cambridge and the prime minister will give readings at a service and lay wreaths. they willjoin 3,000 members of the public, including descendants of those who fought. the battle sparked the period known as the hundred days offensive, which led to the collapse of the german army at the end of world war i. a project being launched today is attempting to map all of the public defibrillators in england and scotland. the british heart foundation is creating a database of all the sites, so that 999 call handlers know where they are and can direct people to them. ben ando has more. public defibrillators are in thousands of locations, easy—to—use, and save lives. apply the patch to the chest, as shown in the picture. apply to patient‘s bare skin. they will tell you exactly what to do, so that even without medical training, anybody can make the difference between life and death. there are tens of thousands of them in stations,
9:08 am
public buildings, offices, and department stores — so why does the uk have far worse cardiac arrest survival rates than countries scandinavia, or in the united states, where they have similar coverage? if you are out and about and your heart suddenly stops, the british heart foundation says your chances of living barely one in ten. that is partly because a lot of us don't know cpr, but also, while there are plenty of defibrillators around, in an emergency, how do you find one? their locations are usually held by ambulance crews, but the british heart foundation says that knowledge can be patchy, and even 999 operators do not always know where the nearest is. and that means that potentially life—saving public defibrillators are used in only 3% of cases. so working with nhs england, nhs scotland, and microsoft, it is launching a year—long scheme map locations, create a national database, and make sure they are regularly checked and repaired.
9:09 am
it is hoped that this simple measure could improve survival rates and save lives. ben ando, bbc news. australia's most highly populated state, new south wales, is in drought after less than ten milimetres of rainfall in certain areas last month. over £330 million of emergency relief funds have been provided by the government to support farmers struggling to feed livestock. more than half of the neighbouring state queensland is also covered by drought. california 5 biggest wildfire on record is expected to burn for the rest of the month, according to us officials. eight blazes covering an area almost as big as los angeles are now burning out of control. president donald trump has declared the situation a major disaster. peter bowes reports. california's new normal. raging wildfires eclipsing previous records in their size and ferocity. about 150 miles north of san francisco, two fires have merged
9:10 am
to create this monster. its sheer size is overwhelming, about the same area as the city of los angeles. fuelled by intensely hot weather, strong winds, low humidity and tinder dry brush, the flames are consuming everything in their path. what can you say? it makes you sick to your stomach. everything they worked for all of their life gone in a heartbeat. the firefighting effort is intense. we are hitting it with the aircraft, cooling it down and that is allowing the ground crews in there to put out the fire. throughout california, more than 14,000 firefighters, some from overseas, and hundreds of us army personnel are battling at least 16 major wildfires. weather forecasters are warning of no letup in the searing temperatures, it could take weeks to bring the current fires under control and the long,
9:11 am
hot summer is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. officials in indonesia say sunday's earthquake has left more than 80,000 people needing shelter on the island of lombok. rescuers are continuing to search through the rubble to look for survivors. several days after the quake, the second to hit the area in a week aftershocks are still being felt. the number of dead stands at 105. argentina 5 senate will vote today on whether to allow abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. abortion is currently illegal there, except in the case of rape or if the woman's health is in danger. if the bill passes, argentina would become only the fourth country in latin america to broadly legalize abortion, and by far the largest. elon musk has said he's considering taking the electric car company, tesla, back into private ownership. the billionaire said he'd secured the more than $70 billion needed to buy back the shares.
9:12 am
trading in tesla was briefly halted on the new york stock exchange after the announcement, but shares eventually ended the day up ii%. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you, julian. two majorfood brands broke the rules about promoting unhealthy foods to children, according to the advertising regulator. inafew in a few minutes we will be talking toa in a few minutes we will be talking to a member of the advertising standards authority to understand more about their thinking and let us know your thoughts. also, fertility treatment. would you ever store your eggs? get in touch. let's get some sport. olly foster is at the bbc is the
9:13 am
centre. good morning. let's talk about the european championships, because it was a golden night for britain last night? it certainly was. it is a multisport events split between berlin and scotland. the athletics in berlin, what a night. three british men were in the 100 metres final. zahn l hughes, cj ujah reece prescod. they got two onto the podium. hughes just pipping reece prescod. they got two onto the podium. hughesjust pipping prescod by 100th of a second on the line. 9.95 seconds. that is a european championship record. a great way for him to get over the disappointment in the commonwealth games earlier this year. he thought he had won the 200 metres was celebrating but was disqualified. he is now the one metres european champion. azeez dina asher—smith. hot favourite going into the women's one of the metres
9:14 am
final. 10.85 seconds. easy win. the joint fastest time in the world this year. that also bettered her own british record. was she happy? judge for yourself. i am so happy. to run a 10.8 is a really big deal. i am really, really happy. i wanted to i’ui'i really, really happy. i wanted to runa10.8. really, really happy. i wanted to run a 10.8. when you come to a championships, anything can happen. as you saw this morning. lam as you saw this morning. iamso as you saw this morning. i am so happy right now! there you 90, i am so happy right now! there you go, she was happy. she defends her 200 metres title as well. action already under way this morning in germany and scotland to mac yes, we will start in berlin. in mr catholic tim duckworth was in the lead in that the kathlyn overnight. they
9:15 am
have at the sixth event already this morning. the 110 metres hurdles. he came third. he is in lane two. just inside the swede. the man who stormed across the line was the home favourite, abele. his lead has been trimmed to 18 points. duckworth is a us college champion. he doesn't sound british. born in california to british parents. he was always going to compete for team gb. his english pa rents to compete for team gb. his english parents said, you are going to be a british athlete. he sure is and he is hanging on there. discus, pole vault, javelin and 1500 metres still to come. elsewhere, we have the open water swimming at loch lomond. and the golf event gets under way as
9:16 am
well, with georgia hall going alongside lauren davis. sack news from the world of athletics? yes, nicholas betts, who had just been competing at the african championships in nigeria, died in a car crash in his native tenure on the way home. he became world champions in beijing in 2015 at the world championships. something of a shock result at the time. he comes from a country famed for its distance runners. he was the first kenyan gold medallist added distance below 800 metres. he was just 28. nicholas betts, who has died in a car crash. very sad news. thank you. two majorfood brands broke the rules about promoting unhealthy foods to children, according to the advertising regulator. the advertising standards agency found that a kfc advert for a sweet drink on a phone box near to a school, and a commercial for kellogg 5 coco pops granola during cartoons, breached its code. this is the first set ofjudgements
9:17 am
on advertising foods that are high in sugar, salt or fat to under—16s since rules were tightened last year. let's speak to jess tye from the regulator the advertising standards agency. stephen woodford, the chief executive of the advertising association which represents advertisers. emily leary, a mum of two children and a food blogger. and meliny tim, a mum who teaches cooking and nutrition in primary schools. welcome to all of you. jess, explain these rules? it seems quite confusing that on the one hand kellogg's was punished for advertising a product that isn't high in sugar, salt acts —— orfat, where as mcdonald's seem to have done effectively the same was fine?
9:18 am
the rules are that you cannot advertise foods which are high in fat, salt or sugar in media targeting children. we know that even when you are promoting a product that is not high in salt, fat or sugar, it is possible through the use of branding to actually have the use of branding to actually have the effect of advertising such a food. in the coco pops granola, although the only product featured was the coco pops granola, there was a lot of general branding in the ad. such as coco the monkey, which viewers are familiar with. and similar things that you would see general coco pops granola. we felt there was insufficient emphasis on there was insufficient emphasis on the granola product. on balance, looking at the ad as a whole, we
9:19 am
felt it was advertising coco pops original. at the time it was high in fat, salt or sugar. it did breach oui’ fat, salt or sugar. it did breach our rules. what about mcdonald's? a lay person may have a certain idea about happy meals. we need to look at the evidence. this was a video for a happy meal online. the combination being advertised was not high in fat, salt or sugar. it was pineapple sticks and chicken nuggets, which don't fall into that category. we also had a look at the information about happy meal combinations in general. actually, the vast majority of options available in the happy meal combination are not high in fat, salt or sugar. it is looking at each ad on its own merits. obviously a
9:20 am
lot of kids would go to mcdonald's and not pick those options. that ad is promoting mcdonald's, as far as pa rents a re is promoting mcdonald's, as far as parents are concerned chumak yes. the focus was on happy meals. it was those we were looking rather the wider branding. the most popular meal combination is not high in fat, salt or sugar. it is important that asa salt or sugar. it is important that as a regulator we follow the evidence. we don't want to discourage advertisers from promoting unhealthy foods to children. is the advertiser trying to get around the rules? we represent the advertisers, the agencies, the production companies etc. no advertiser is trying to get around the rules. they are always try to stay within the rules. we we re try to stay within the rules. we were talking about this this morning. first of all a mistake by kfc, which they acknowledged. in effect, kellogg's promoting a
9:21 am
healthier variant of coco pops granola is that advertisers are always try to stay within the rules. it visually seemed to be promoting coco pops granola? the court coco pops granola is not... perhaps this was an issue about timing. when the complaint was made, the judgment was made the ad would have been cleared before it went on air to make sure it stayed within the rules. it is a myth that advertisers try to flout the rules. chose hope team advertisers are to target the young audience. mcconnells are promoting happy meals, which are in effect healthy alternatives. kellogg's were promoting granola. they are looking
9:22 am
to promote healthier choices for children. let's bring in the mums. how susceptible our kids to the ads they see? i think they are very susceptible. children are drawn to visual aids. any advert, especially if they target children, are very visual. so yes, children are definitely drawn to adverts that are targeted for them. when we look at the specific case of mcdonald's and be happy meal being judged as being 0k be happy meal being judged as being ok by the advertising standards agency, because it was showing a selection of healthy items on the menu, do you think that would actually affect kids in a way that maybe next time you going to mcdonald's with your child, they may say, actually, iwill go mcdonald's with your child, they may say, actually, i will go for the healthy snacks rather than the chips
9:23 am
and whatever else? i think actually if it is done alongside education in schools or in the home or with guidance from parents, children will actually make that positive choice. but again, it has to be with education and with guidance. emily, what do you think? pester power, how much of the next —— and much of a factor has been? it is definitely a factor. we imagine they see an advert on tv and the children turn to the parents and say, i want that. it filters through more subconsciously and it will be when you're walking down the supermarket aisle, or walking past a particular restaurant, that they say, i recognise that and therefore i think i wanted. that is how ads play into pester power. what do you think of the changes to the rules? have they
9:24 am
made a positive difference?” the changes to the rules? have they made a positive difference? i think they are great. it is our responsibility to equip her children with all the tools they need to make healthy choices and recognises not good food and bad food, it is about a balanced diet. if you're eating sugary and fatty food, it is not so great. what these changes do is they just help parents to not be kind of consta ntly just help parents to not be kind of constantly battling the message that kids are getting. if kids are getting healthy messages, all the better. jess, what is the punishment for anybody who preaches the new rules ? for anybody who preaches the new rules? the punishment is they have to withdraw their advertising from that children's space. kfc did take prompt action in removing their ads. we would expect them to make sure they are doing that across the piece. it has already had an effect? yes it has. companies do not want this adverse publicity. i would
9:25 am
agree with stephen. companies try very ha rd to agree with stephen. companies try very hard to avoid getting this kind of bad publicity. you could also say that any publicity is good publicity because we are talking about it. is there an upside, also for mcdonald's? i think in a way mcdonald's? i think in a way mcdonald's being discussed in this way, we are talking about happy meals, that is probably a good thing for a happy meals and they have made huge progress as a food retailer to improve the health of their menus. kellogg's macro —— kellogg's won't be happy about this. this publicity will be very worrying. they will have tried in effect to do the right thing. reducing sugar, they have launched granola and are advertising to kids. just to take up the point oi'i to kids. just to take up the point on pester power. the rules forbid any adds that encourage pester power. the can't target under 16s.
9:26 am
kfc, inadvertently, put one ad on a phone box near a school. one of thousands of ads. these rules are there to protect children. that is what the industry is trying to do. pupils are there because pester power has been such a thing. kids and parents are vulnerable when these ads put around them. the rules are there because advertising has an effect, otherwise advertisers would not use that approach. we know that the evidence shows that ads play a small, but they do play a part in food preference for children. it is outweighed by a number of other factors, including parental input and the messages they get from schools. advertising does play a pa rt schools. advertising does play a part in that. it is important that
9:27 am
we act as a regulator make sure that advertising is responsible in her with his promoting these products. but that we don't inadvertently have the effect of discouraging them from doing things like developing non—add salt or sugar variants. it is about treading the line between being robust and protecting children but allowing these products to be advertised to an adult audience, for example. melanie, i know you teach cooking and nutrition in school. how difficult is it to get healthy eating methods through tickets? when you start at a young age, when you start at key stage one and early years, the children are really receptive. they actually built that into their foundational knowledge, so into their foundational knowledge, so when they choose foods, they do actually look at choosing their five actually look at choosing their five a day, making sure they are eating their fruit a day, making sure they are eating theirfruit and a day, making sure they are eating their fruit and vegetables. i have found that going into schools and
9:28 am
teaching from a young age, it has positively influenced them. and speaking to parents, i have had feedback from parents send their children are being more open to eating more fruit and vegetables. they are very keen to try new foods. i think that's why i say if we are able to educate the children, they are able then to make a better informed choice. that is a great thing, even for advertisers, informed choice. that is a great thing, even foradvertisers, because your speaker there was saying it allows companies to bring in new product lines in line with healthy eating and healthy choices. the theme of parental responsibility is coming through on the messages coming through on the messages coming in. stewart says no doubt children are drawn towards fast food ads but you don't eat mcdonald's every day. parents are responsible
9:29 am
for childhood obesity, not advertising. if children say they wa nt advertising. if children say they want all the time, usain no like we we re want all the time, usain no like we were told. chhapra says it is the responsibility of parents to educate children and to regulate as much as they can to ensure healthy wins over junk. there are some in the healthy foods on the market. ian on facebook says, what is the point when you have a fish and chip shop, a pizza shop and a greggs outside schools? emily, a final thought from you?m is very much about the relationship between parents and children. let's between parents and children. let's be honest, it is ok for the children to have some treats. it is about that balance. let's not hide anything unhealthy from them ever. let them make healthy choices. thank you all. do keep your thoughts coming in. still to come. 100 years from the battle of amiens, we look at the celebrations taking
9:30 am
place today and look at why it is seen as place today and look at why it is seen as the turning point of the first world war. 120,000 people died overfour first world war. 120,000 people died over four days. and we will look at a scheme in oxford which is to revolutionise how we think about donating to homeless people by getting members of the public to give money using their smartphones by an app. borisjohnson boris johnson wrote that borisjohnson wrote that muslim women who wore the full face veil looked like letterboxes or bank robbers. theresa may has called for him to apologise. kellogg's and kfc have been found to have breached advertising rules of the complaints we re advertising rules of the complaints were upheld by the advertising standards authority. kfc‘s advert was placed near a school, while a
9:31 am
coco pops granola advert was shown during a cartoon. rules say these foods cannot be promoted to under 16s. foods cannot be promoted to under 165. kfc foods cannot be promoted to under 16s. kfc say the placement of the advert was human error, while kergg advert was human error, while kellogg say they have reduced the amount of sugar in coco pops. a 31—year—old man has been charged with the murder of the rapper sidique kamara, who was stabbed to death in south london last week. mr kamara, also know as incognito, was part of the controversial drill music scene, which is thought to glamorise violence. kenneth umezie is due to appear at bromley magistrates‘ court later today. a petition that could force a by—election in a key seat in northern ireland, and remove the current mp ian paisley, will open later. the dup politician is already suspended over his failure to declare two family holidays paid for by the sri lankan government. he's apologised, but will face a by—election if 10% of his constituents sign the petition. theresa may and prince william will attend a ceremony in northern france to mark the centenary of the battle of amiens — the beginning of the end of world war i.
9:32 am
the duke of cambridge and the prime minister will give readings at a service and lay wreaths. they willjoin 3,000 members of the public, including descendants of those who fought. the battle sparked the period known as the hundred days offensive, which led to the collapse of the german army at the end of world war i. australia's most highly populated state, new south wales, is in drought after less than ten milimetres of rainfall in certain areas last month. over £330 million of emergency relief funds have been provided by the government to support farmers struggling to feed livestock. more than half of the neighbouring state queensland is also covered by drought. firefighters have called for verge ofa firefighters have called for verge of a fire whirl which engulfed a plastic factory and reached a height of over 50 feet. the leicestershire fire and rescue service said the unusual site was created by cool air entering the top of the hot air, causing a swirl similar to the way a
9:33 am
tornado is formed. that is a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with olly. and these are our sports headlines this morning. there was a golden double in the 100m for great britain at the european championships last night. dina asher—smith and zharnel hughes are the new champions. reece prescod also took silver in berlin. great britain's tim duckworth leads the decathlon after six events but saw his advantage trimmed to 18 points after this mornings 110 metres hurdles. the british number one, johanna konta, came from a set down down at the rogers cup to win herfirst—round match against the former french open champion jelena ostapenka. next up in montreal will be victoria azarenka. and one day to go before the transfer window shuts, chelsea keeper thibaus courtois failed to report for training for a second day running. he's been linked with a move to real madrid. that's all the sport for now.
9:34 am
thank you very much, olly. boris johnson, the man who wanted to lead the conservative party, has rejected calls from all sides to apologise for saying women who wear face veils look like "bank robbers" and "letterboxes". he's been accused of racism and using muslim women as a political football to boost his popularity. does the conservative party itself have a problem with muslims? this all comes after the muslim council of britain said recently that incidents of islamophobia in the conservative party were happening at a rate of more than one a week. let's tried to answer those questions with andrew bridgen,
9:35 am
shazia awan, a former conservative party parliamentary candidate, who says she experienced anti—muslim bigotry. and in our salford studio is mohammed amin, a lifelong conservative supporter who as chairman of the conservative muslim forum encourages other muslims tojoin and support the party. andrew bridgen, should borisjohnson apologise? no, we are a liberal democracy, we should be able to have that debate, and i reject these accusations of islamophobia in the conservative party. i myself am the chairman of the all—party parliamentary group for uzbekistan, baroness warsi is part of that group, and uzbekistan cars and face coverings in 1992. —— has banned. no—one saying there can't be a debate, just don't use offensive language. he wrote a column for a
9:36 am
national newspaper which is there to attract readers, i'm sure the daily telegraph is delighted with the coverage they have got for their newspaper, we are in the silly season and there is no news about. does that make it ok to say whatever you like, however offensive people mightfind you like, however offensive people might find it? there is very little that you can say that somebody doesn't find offensive, many things thatjeremy corbyn doesn't find offensive, many things that jeremy corbyn and doesn't find offensive, many things thatjeremy corbyn and other politicians say which i find offensive, but i am willing to fight for their right to be able to say it, because we live in a democracy. so there's nothing wrong with what he said? it is not language i would have used, but it is conversation i have used, but it is conversation i have heard in company, and i think most people in the country will have heard that. how do you respond to this? i am interested in what company he keeps, probably fellow conservatives, i spent nearly a decade in the conservative party, i stood for council and parliament, andl stood for council and parliament, and i was the first woman of colour to even address a welsh conservative party conference. when i was a party
9:37 am
member, i stood in 2010, the problems were very much with the grassroots, but now the main issue is that it is coming from the top down. the real problem in the conservative party is bigotry, xenophobia, islamophobia and racism. look back to 1964, the smethwick election campaign, where they said if you want a n word for your neighbour, vote labour. 2016, the horrible campaign they ran against sadiq khan in this city, so beautifully diverse, it was full of beer, smear and bigotry, beautifully diverse, it was full of beer, smearand bigotry, and a re—hired lynton crosby, who is known for stirring up hatred. in one of my selection sort of parliamentary selection sort of parliamentary selection things, i was asked, what are my views on the rule of the british raj? what do i make of the national black policeman is an association, why do you people need it? at many party events, i have been greeted with surprise that my
9:38 am
father or my husband or my brother are allowing me to be involved in the political process, and well done, because the assumption is that muslim women... i want to go back, as you say, this is coming from the top down, theresa may has said these comments are not acceptable, she is calling on him to apologise. as home secretary, theresa may signed off on the go home or face arrest bands when she was in the home office. when i say from the top—down, what i is that previously my own experience was issued from the grassroots. at the time, david cameron was leader of the party, tirelessly trying to modernise the conservative party, and theresa may and david cameron in 2016 oversaw the zac goldsmith campaign which brought hate into our city. the conservative party seems to currently be thriving on this divide and rule notion which, again, harks back to the british raj
9:39 am
mentality. the issue is bigger than boris or what he has said. yes, we need a debate on these issue, but if boris seriously wanted a debate, if anyone in the conservative party series they wanted a debate, they could go and see baroness warsi. she brought up islamophobia in 2011 and has tirelessly asked for an inquiry. she has been ignored. we are talking about islamophobia and they are not listening. andrew bridgen, the labour party has faced scrutiny... this is not the party i recognise... because you are a privileged white man... you have because you are a privileged white man... you have never because you are a privileged white man... you have never walked a mile in my shoes. let him answer the point, you said this is the party that you know, he is saying it is not the party he knows — so explain. the labour party are mired in anti—semitism, those on the left would love to get the conservatives road... would love to get the conservatives road. . . why would love to get the conservatives road... why are you talking about labour? this isjust a distraction,
9:40 am
and political opponents within our own party see borisjohnson as a threat, it is an excellent stick. would you talk to me if i was wearing a niqab? yesterday you said it would make you feel uncomfortable. and i would if you are wearing a full face crash helmet! mohammed amin, chair of the conservative muslim forum, do you think the party has a problem with islamophobia? i have been a conservative party member or five years, and! conservative party member or five years, and i would not have stayed in the party if i thought the party was anti—muslim. there is undoubtedly a problem with some people in the conservative party who have expressed anti—muslim views. we have expressed anti—muslim views. we have a tough code of conduct, and out have a tough code of conduct, and our party chairman, brandon lewis, has made it clear a few weeks ago that he will have a zero—tolerance approach to islamophobia. and boris johnson has been called upon by both the party chairman and the prime
9:41 am
minister to apologise for his remarks, which were deliberately chosen to be inflammatory and offensive, which is not the kind of language we expect from a senior politician, someone who was foreign secretary, who aspires to be party leader. should he be kicked out? if he apologises, that should be the end of the matter. i rememberwhen david cameron sent borisjohnson to liverpool to apologise for what he said about hillsborough. boris johnson has a habit of using offensive and inflammatory language, irememberthe offensive and inflammatory language, i remember the comments on pickaninnies, about obama's kenyan ancestry, and it is not the sort of language we should have from a senior politician who aspires to lead the country. why would an apology be enough? apology plus repentance. he knows what he is doing when he makes those comments.
9:42 am
he should recognise that what he is doing has backfired and should not doing has backfired and should not do it again. andrew bridgen? boris is at pains to point out that there is at pains to point out that there isa is at pains to point out that there is a debate around the baker across europe, and a lot of countries have decided to ban face coverings — france, belgium, germany, austria, denmark, and a partial ban... but the reason we're not having a constructive debate around those things is because the headline, and he knew it would be the headline, is something people found. the answer of banning face coverings across a whole swathe of northern europe, he came out clearly in his article, and i would agree with him, i am not co mforta ble i would agree with him, i am not comfortable about governments telling people what they should wear if it is within the law, i agree with boris, but a couple of lines from that where i would not have
9:43 am
used that language, but he was doing it in used that language, but he was doing itina used that language, but he was doing it in a humorous way. it is not funny! islamophobia is not funny. you think it is kind of a joke, you think it is silly season, you should be ashamed. if i was his constituent, i would campaign to get him deselected, and he needs to be made an example, because conservatives like you come on and — it isa conservatives like you come on and — it is a joke, you should be embarrassed, i would it is a joke, you should be embarrassed, iwould be it is a joke, you should be embarrassed, i would be embarrassed to be your constituent. this is pointless, we live in a democracy, you are entitled to your opinion, i'm entitled to mine, boris is entitled to his opinion, your viewers are entitled to theirs. because we live in a liberal democracy, i am because we live in a liberal democracy, iam not because we live in a liberal democracy, i am not up for banning face coverings, but the quid pro quo of that is that we have the freedom of that is that we have the freedom of speech for people to express their views and discuss it, that comes with the territory. the culture secretary said the quid pro quo of holding a public position is to hold yourself to a high standard, not savings which provoke division.
9:44 am
what do you think of the governments in belgium, france, germany, austria and holland who have banned the burqa? you and holland who have banned the burqa ? you are and holland who have banned the burqa? you are having a go at our liberal democracy, we're not suggesting a ban, and yet you want to ban talking about the issue. that is not democracy. is this about boris johnson's is not democracy. is this about borisjohnson's personal is not democracy. is this about boris johnson's personal ambition?‘ lot of the attacks on him are people seeing him, inside the party and outside, as a threat, and it is an opportunity for people to attack him. as he made these comments deliberately to appeal to a certain constituency? he is a high profile, charismatic politician, anything he says gets picked up in the media, it isa says gets picked up in the media, it is a slow news week... you are talking about women's lives, our women dress, please don't touch me. you are talking about muslim women being spat out in the street, women in headscarves being ostracised, i have got a good friend in cardiff who recently decided to start
9:45 am
wearing the hijab because she wanted to be seen as muslim. what this is doing, what bigotry like this is doing, what bigotry like this is doing, what bigotry like this is doing, what you do not understand is that it doing, what you do not understand is thatitis doing, what you do not understand is that it is making people politicised religion, it is making people want to be seen as visibly muslim, because the politics is becoming so against muslim people in this country. there are three british muslims in this country, and we are being ostracised. the conservative party should know better, theresa may, as a self—proclaimed feminist, she should know better, and i really don't see how anyone can take the conservative party seriously until they apologise for the zac goldsmith campaign, and then even come onto these borisjohnson campaign, and then even come onto these boris johnson comments. mohammed amin, the muslim council of britain says there needs to be an inquiry into islamophobia within the tory party, do you agree? the conservative party sent an open letter to theresa may at the beginning ofjune, letter to theresa may at the beginning of june, calling letter to theresa may at the beginning ofjune, calling for an
9:46 am
independent inquiry into anti—muslim bigotry, islamophobia in the conservative party, an independent inquiry, not a public inquiry. and the reason is that when i go around the reason is that when i go around the country talking to groups of muslims, i consistently get a message from them that they think the conservative party is anti—muslim. i think it is inaccurate, but it really is important to have an inquiry to clear the air. what if boris johnson doesn't apologise? if boris johnson doesn't apologise? if boris johnson doesn't apologise, he will be bringing the conservative party into disrepute, he is already damaging the conservative party, notjust with muslim brothers but with many liberal minded voters in this country who want us to be a tolerant, inclusive country, and if he refuses to obey his party leader and apologise, then he should have the whip withdrawn. what about people who would say that boris is boris. boris is boris is not good enough any more. this kind of behaviour is not acceptable. andrew
9:47 am
has e—mailed saying that ranting about boris and his comments, it is doing exactly what boris is doing, inflaming islamophobia, boris is defending the right for women to dress as they wish, but by concentrating on the letterbox comment, it makes you wonder whether he has read the comment in full. let's face it, one person says, can you imaginea let's face it, one person says, can you imagine a white man being served wearing a scheme ask? whatever happens to the old logic of as in rome, i agree with borisjohnson. i think borisjohnson rome, i agree with borisjohnson. i think boris johnson has rome, i agree with borisjohnson. i think borisjohnson has said what an awful lot of people think, we are a supposed christian, they choose to live here, they should abide by our rules. is the topic of talking about the veil off—limits? rules. is the topic of talking about the veil off-limits? of course not, i think we should talk about, it is good to have the debate. if you are going on pilgrimage to mecca, you can't wear the veil, and i would
9:48 am
prefer to talk to somebody who's face i could see. but i will defend any woman's right to wear what she wants. the way to start this debate is to speak to the muslim council of britain, the conservative forum, baroness cider barzagli, who said islamophobia had passed the dinner party test in 2011. —— baroness warsi. if the conservative party have nothing to hide, have the debate, if they think it is more releva nt debate, if they think it is more relevant than how the country is run, foreign policy, brexit, if you wa nt run, foreign policy, brexit, if you want to debate energy, go and speak to grassroots muslim women before writing and article in the telegraph. your articles on the veil are telegraph. your articles on the veil a re exactly telegraph. your articles on the veil are exactly the same as those espoused in the article by boris johnson, absolutely amazing. we are talking about the language used, for example calling a woman looking like a bank robber, the prime minister in waiting in pakistan wears a full
9:49 am
burqa, heaven forbid borisjohnson was still foreign secretary, would he say, hey, your wife looks like a bank robber? this would have been an international incident, he needs to think of his position before he speaks, the way to have a debate is to have it on a positive tone, not using these negative, horrible language about women and what they wear. we have had loads of comments on this, as you would expect. jared says boris johnson on this, as you would expect. jared says borisjohnson is a marmite character, but there is a curtailing freedom of speech on religious issues, i sometimes upset religious sensitivities, free speech is massively important and a secular religion will have to adjust and not the people who do not believe in the religion. theresa may has made a mistake insisting boris apologises, there should be no religious bias,
9:50 am
calling for ministers to resign. thank you all very much for coming on to talk about it. we asked the conservtive party for a statement, but they have not yet responded to our request. coming up, leading obstetricians are warning women who want to freeze their eggs to have babies later in life can be fraught with problems. we will be speaking to women who are frozen their eggs and fertility specialists. today marks 100 years since the battle of amiens. it was seen as the turning point of the first world war and marked the beginning of what came to be known as the hundred days, a string of military successes that led to the collapse of the german army and the end of the war. a special service of commemoration will be held at amiens cathedral. the duke of cambridge, the prime minister, representatives of the countries involved in the battle and descendants of soldiers are expected to attend. we can speak now to laura clouting, who is a senior curator at imperial war museums. thank you very much forjoining us.
9:51 am
tell us why this battle was so important. the battle of amiens really is the culmination of everything that we think of when it comes to the first world war. manpower, heavy artillery, and actually it is a change from the early war years, because the war becomes mobile again. it is a pivot point, this battle, a key turning point, this battle, a key turning point where, from the early months of 1918 the allies have had what was described as their backs against the wall, but the battle of amiens for the british and their empire forces, it is the beginning of a change, of a shift, and what is so crucial about it is the allies have planned this, they have an element of surprise, a huge element of surprise, a huge element of surprise, the germans are taken aback by what is launched 100 years ago today on the outskirts of the
9:52 am
town where i am now, and it is a decisive move into a new sphere where100 days later, armistice assigned and the war comes to a close. amiens is that pivot point, that turning point. and it is staggering to note that 120,000 people died over those four days of conflict. absolutely. i mean, we can't underestimate the casualties, which are ongoing in 1918. we often think of heavy casualties in terms of things like the first day of the battle of the somme, which was never surpassed for britain in terms of the number of men who died on that day alone, but by 1918, what is also staggering, beyond the human cost, particularly to the german forces, is the number of prisoners taken. it is the number of prisoners taken. it isa is the number of prisoners taken. it is a staggering quantity of men who surrender, and the reason why they do that was because of their morale being so much lower, their supply
9:53 am
chain is so much weaker, but for allies, in contrast, confidence has grown, and this battle solidifies the confidence and allows the allies to push ahead to ultimate victory. there is a real change in fortunes thatis there is a real change in fortunes that is summarised by the battle that is summarised by the battle that we commemorate today. how important is it to commemorate the battle ? important is it to commemorate the battle? i think any centenary is a useful moments to look back and to try to understand more about the conflict. amiens is interesting, because perhaps it doesn't come as quickly to mind as the somme or something like the battle of passchendaele, and i think one of the reasons for that, why the centenary is very useful, is that this was just one of many battles which led to ultimate victory, because really the allies had moved on away from thinking that one encounter on the battlefield, in one sector, was going to win the war in a very dramatic moment. instead, 1918 is the culmination of
9:54 am
attritional warfare, where the enemy is ground down, the germans are exhausted, and it is bringing together all of those elements of leadership, manpower, firepower and grinding the enemy down into ultimate submission, and i think thatis ultimate submission, and i think that is why it is a useful moment to reflect upon that and look at amiens was one of many battles in a really dramatic year that is 1918. thank you very much, laura. elon musk, the owner of electric car company tesla, says he's considering taking the firm private. musk made the announcement on twitter and said it was the best path forward for the company. theo leggett, why does he think it is the best way forward? because every three months he has to come out with his management team and issue financial statements and a nswer issue financial statements and answer questions, and he thinks puts the emphasis on short—term, rather than his long—term strategy of
9:55 am
building up the company. he wants to ta ke building up the company. he wants to take it private, that makes although the company will still have to issue accounts, it won't have to answer to shareholders every three months. so it won't have those problems. also, tesla shares tend to get sold by people who are gambling on a falling market, so there is an incentive for some investors to benefit from tesla shares falling, so from bad news about tesla, and he thinks it will discourage that behaviour. what would his long—term strategy be? how divergent is it from what is happening at the moment? the company started out as a make of a small number of luxury electric cars, and he wants to be a mass—market car—maker. the new car that they have released, the model 3, is meant to be cheaper and easierfor people to be cheaper and easierfor people to buy, but there has been a huge focus on getting the number of cars made each week that it needs before it can become profitable, and he thinks all the attention on production targets is very distracting, and he would rather step out of the public eye a little
9:56 am
bit in that respect and focus on getting the company where it needs to be. elon musk is quite a character with a reputation for doing things in an unusual way, and making an announcement like this on twitter, rather than by a statement to the stock exchange, or in the case of the united states, the us markets, is an unusual thing to do. but he is a man who speaks from the hip. has he got the money? he says he has the money, and we can assume he has the money, and we can assume he would not have made a statement like this unless it was being treated very seriously, because otherwise there is a risk of getting into trouble with regulators. 0k, we will see what happens, thank you very much. coming up, there are thousands of defibrillators across the uk, but would you know where to find one and how to use it? campaigners are hoping a new map could help to treat people after cardiac arrest. we will be showing you how to use a different later. right now let's catch up with the weather with carol kirkwood. mixed fortunes today, some have a
9:57 am
very sunny start, as you can see from this picture in east yorkshire, lovely blue skies, but a bit more cloud in wiltshire, and we could see the odd shower, because that is the forecast today, a mix of sunshine and showers, but you will notice it is going to feel cool and fresh as well. we have got a weather front moving from the west to the east, thatis moving from the west to the east, that is bringing showers with it, and the squeeze on isobars shows it is breezy here. first thing, a lot of sunshine, the showers in the west will push eastward through the course of the day, in between sunny spells, but we could see heavy ones this afternoon across scotland and northern ireland, with the odd rumble of thunder. few if any getting into the far south—east, temperatures peaking at 25, maybe 26 here. yesterday graveside and had the highest temperature, 33.2 celsius. —— gravesend. wherever you
9:58 am
are, cool and fresher than yesterday. through the evening, showers fading, early evening sunshine, more cloud is developing across the south—east, that will produce showers overnight, and we have got a new weather front coming in across western scotland and northern ireland, that will introduce some showery outbreaks of rain. a cool night in the north, temperatures in towns and cities in single figures, ruralareas temperatures in towns and cities in single figures, rural areas a bit lower than that, maybe four in parts of the highlands. but not as cold as we come further south, not as warm as last night either in the south—east. so tomorrow the showers in the south—east fading, hanging on to the cloud, more rain coming in across east anglia and generally the south—eastern corner. some of these might edge a little bit further west, we still have showers bring western scotland and northern ireland, with the odd everyone, rumbles of thunder, but in between a fair bit of sunshine with coastal showers around the coasts of wales
9:59 am
and south—west england. temperatures on thursday, though, below average widely for the time of year, we haven't seen that for quite a bit. then on friday, still a lot of dry weather around, still some showers across the south and the day we will see more rain sweeping in to the south—west, and for the weekend it looks like our area of low pressure we have been talking about this week will bring some rain across the far north. hello, it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock. i'm joanna gosling. women freezing their eggs so they can have children later in life is on the rise despite it costing thousands of pounds, but today leading obstetricians have issued a warning telling women it cannot always be relied on. using frozen eggs only has a one in five chance of a successful delivery. so what needs to change to make sure women don't leave it too late to get pregnant? pressure is building on boris johnson over comments he made likening women who wear face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers, with one tory peer now saying he should be kicked out of the party.
10:00 am
a former conservative party parliamentary candidate says she has experienced anti—muslim bigotry. would you know where to find your nearest defibriliator, let alone how to use one? there are thousands of the machines across the uk and campaigners hope a new map could help save tens of thousands of lives. we will be speaking to the father of 15—year—old ben daniels who collapsed and died of a cardiac arrest. he supports the campaign. we will share his story. here's julian worricker in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. good morning. there's growing pressure on the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as a muslim peer calls for him to be kicked out of the conservative party over comments he made about women who wear a burqa. mrjohnson wrote that muslim women who wore the full face veil looked like "letterboxes" or "bank robbers". theresa may has called for him to apologise. kellogg's and kfc have been
10:01 am
found to have breached advertising rules after complaints were upheld by the advertising standards authority. kfc‘s advert was placed near a school, while a coco pops granola advert was shown during a cartoon. rules state that companies cannot promote foods high in fat, salt or sugar to under—16s. kfc says the placement of the poster was "human error", while kellogg's said they had now reduced sugar in coco pops original cereal by 40%. a 31—year—old man has been charged with the murder of the rapper sidique kamara, who was stabbed to death in south london last week. mr kamara, also know as incognito, was part of the controversial drill music scene which is thought to glamorise violence. kenneth umezie is due to appear at bromley magistrates court later today. a petition that could force a by—election in a key seat in northern ireland and remove the current mp, ian paisley, opens today.
10:02 am
the dup politician is already suspended over his failure to declare two family holidays paid for by the sri lankan government. he's apologised, but will face a by—election if 10% of his constituents sign the petition. theresa may and prince william will attend a ceremony in northern france to mark the centenary of the battle of amiens, the beginning of the end of world war one. they willjoin 3,000 members of the public, including descendants of those who fought. the battle sparked the period known as the 100 days offensive, which led to the collapse of the german army at the end of world war one. australia's most highly populated state, new south wales, is in drought after less than 10 milimetres of rainfall in certain areas last month. over £330 million of emergency relief funds have been provided by the government to support farmers struggling to feed livestock. more than half of the neighbouring state queensland is also covered by drought. officials in indonesia say sunday's earthquake has left
10:03 am
more than 80,000 people needing shelter on the island of lombok. rescuers are continuing to search through the rubble to look for survivors. several days after the quake, the second to hit the area in a week aftershocks are still being felt. the number of dead stands at 105. elon musk has said he's considering taking the electric car company, tesla, back into private ownership. the billionaire said he'd secured the more than $70 billion needed to buy back the shares. trading in tesla was briefly halted on the new york stock exchange after the announcement, but shares eventually ended the day up 11%. firefighters have caught footage ofa firenado , orfire whirl, which engulfed a plastic factory and reached a height of over 50ft. the leicestershire fire and rescue service said the unusual sight was created by cool air entering the top of the hot air, causing a swirl similar to how a tornado is formed. that's a summary of the latest bbc
10:04 am
news — more at 10.30. thank you very much. we will be looking later at a scheme in oxford which hopes to revolutionise how we think about donating to homeless people by getting members of the public to donate money using their smart —— smartphone via an app. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live. if you re emailing and are happy for us to contact you ? and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. if you text, you ll be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now. olly foster is at the bbc sport centre. hello again. it was a great night in berlin at the european championships. a british double in the 100 metres. zharnel hughes was one of three british sprinters in the men's mace, just pipping reece prescod by 100th of a second. and he
10:05 am
said a european championship record. gina asher—smith was hot favourite in the women's event. —— dina asher—smith. she won gold and said thejoint asher—smith. she won gold and said the joint fastest time in the world this year. it bettered her rolling this year. it bettered her rolling this record. i am so happy. to run a 10.8 is a really big deal. i am really, really happy. i wanted to run a 10.8. when you come to a championships, anything can happen. as you saw this morning. i am so happy right now! british decathlete tim duckworth was 95 points clear at the top of the leaderboard overnight. he has gone backwards today. his lead was reduced to 18 points after the hurdles. after the disc as he has slipped to second behind the german artare able. slipped to second behind the german
10:06 am
art are able. —— abele. he is 22 yea rs art are able. —— abele. he is 22 years old, a us college champion born in california during this pa rents. born in california during this parents. pole vaulter, javelin and 1500 metres still to come. staying with athletics, former world champion nicolas bett has died in his native kenya after a car crash. he took the 400 metres hurdles title in beijing in 2015, a shock result at the time for a country famed for its distance runners. he was the first kenyan gold medallist at a distance below 800 metres. he was 28 yea rs distance below 800 metres. he was 28 years old. johanna konta is into the second round of the rogers cup in montreal. she came from a set down. she beatjelena ostapenko. she will play victoria azarenka. the football tra nsfer play victoria azarenka. the football transfer window closes tomorrow in england. chelsea look set to break the record fee for a goalkeeper. the
10:07 am
23—year—old spaniard is reportedly having a medical in london today ahead of a rumoured £71 million mood —— move from athletic bilbao. he will replace thibaut courtois, who has skipped chelsea training for the past couple of days. he is hankering after a move to real madrid. —— real madrid. back with headlines in 20 minutes. rank you. women freezing their eggs is on the rise, despite it costing up is on the rise, despite it costing up to £7,000. however, leading obstetricians are urging caution if people are relying on the process so they can have a baby in later life. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says egg freezing does not guarantee future live births — figures show there is around a 20%, success rate. there are also controversial storage limits for how long the eggs can be kept. a maximum of ten years. medical experts are also warning many women are leaving it too late to preserve their fertility,
10:08 am
instead of a planned and informed choice. while it is advised that women freeze their eggs before they turn 35, in the uk in 2016 only a third of patients were in that age group. the rest were older. we have got a long cast list of people joining we have got a long cast list of peoplejoining us. emily grossman. she's been through four cycles of egg freezing, which started 18 months ago. claire fenlon froze her eggs in 2008, which she then used and 13 months ago she gave birth to her son. she was 47. we also have dr virginia bolton, from the royal college of obstetricians and gynecologists. and chair of the human fertilisation and embryology authority, sally cheshire. they are the uk's independent regulator overseeing the use of gametes and embryos in fertility treatment and research. sarah norcross is director of the progress educational trust, which aims to improve the choices for people affected by infertility or genetic conditions.
10:09 am
marisa bate is in her early 30s and has considered freezing her eggs but can t afford it. professor geeta nargund has called for the nhs to provide egg freezing for childless women. and fertility coach, sarah holland. thank you all very much indeed for joining us to discuss this. we will start with you, junior, because you are from the royal college of art such as is and gynaecologists. it is warning women to be cautious when freezing eggs for social reasons. how many women freezing eggs for social reasons. how many women are freezing eggs for social reasons. how many women are actually doing it? i must emphasise that although i ama it? i must emphasise that although i am a spokesperson for the college, i'm nota am a spokesperson for the college, i'm not a clinical doctor. i'm not an obstetrician house gynaecologists. i worked for many yea rs gynaecologists. i worked for many years in the laboratory. in terms of
10:10 am
the numbers, i think sally cheshire can probably best to give you the figures. they are collating figures for the uk. the numbers are still relatively small compared to couples undergoing fertility treatment. but they are certainly on the rise for women exploring the possibility of freezing their eggs and going ahead and doing so. it is presumably in the hundreds? definitely. women can potentially have up to four cycles. the number of cycles women wish to take, if they pay for them themselves, is their choice. there is no restriction. what we really need to discuss is the appropriateness of undergoing such treatment and whether or not we need to explore the possibility of raising people's awareness of the importance of trying to achieve their infertility potential naturally, rather than resorting to medical technology to assist them.
10:11 am
emily, you did freeze your eggs 18 months ago. why did you choose to do that? i got to my late 30s and basically the panic of wanting one day to have children against the fa ct day to have children against the fact that i was not in a position, ina fact that i was not in a position, in a relationship position to be able to do that then, really began to get my attention. i had heard information about how fertility rates dropped by half between 35 and 40, half again between 40 and 42. i didn't want to get to the point at which i was ready to have children and lose the possibility. i was seeing women around me of my age rushing into relationships with partners that they perhaps weren't quite sure about, having children and ending up not in a secure relationship and being single parents. i was seeing women older than me who were in their early 40s. they were struggling to conceive or
10:12 am
finally get almost impossible. i saw the devastating impact was having an women of my age bracket. to me it seemed a beautiful opportunity that science allows us to take a pause in out science allows us to take a pause in our biological clock. yes it's expensive. it is challenging. but i'm so grateful that i have had the opportunity to kind of take this panic out of my everyday life. nobody wants to be that woman on a date desperately looking for a baby partner, which is what our biology, my age, makes us want to do. biology has not kept up with our social evolution, where women are having better careers, fulfilling their potential, are more empowered. and therefore, are not always in a position to have children by the time they are 35, which is where there fertility is optimal. there are a lot of women my age you have not found the right partner, who have not found someone they want to have not found someone they want to have a child with. thank you. you
10:13 am
brought lots of the issues in. one of the things i was struck by was that science allows us to take a pause in biological clock. sally cheshire from the human fertilisation and embryology authority, what we are hearing today is sort of, but actually you have got a one in five chance of successfully having a baby from frozen eggs. how do you see it? statistics show that around 18% of patients who use their own eggs, that rate is higher when you use donor eggs. that rate is below the rate that we see for ivf, which of course isn't a guarantee either. that offers you a chance of one in four successes that offers you a chance of one in foui' successes per that offers you a chance of one in four successes per cycle. emily's case is quite typical of some of the women considering egg freezing. it is important to say that social egg freezing is becoming more common.
10:14 am
but actually, there are lots of women who have to undergo medical procedures for cancer, for example, who do need to freeze their eggs one that treatment might damage their infertility. there are different groups of people who might be considering egg freezing. sarah, what we are talking about here is this message that you can pause the biological clock and choose when to have babies if you freeze the embryos. obviously we are talking today about the fact it is not as efficient as people might have hoped. does the possibility mean there is a different debate around when women can have babies and what the options are? i really welcome the options are? i really welcome the report today. it urges people to cancel their patients and be cautious about relying on this. for some people it will work, for others it want. others may not seek
10:15 am
recourse to it. they can have babies the old—fashioned recourse to it. they can have babies the old —fashioned way. recourse to it. they can have babies the old—fashioned way. it is a bigger issue than social egg freezing. to me the issues are around fertility education, that people should understand the limits on their natural biology. men need to understand the limits on women's natural biology. i have got five nephews, for in their 20s and 30s, andi nephews, for in their 20s and 30s, and i would say this to them. they need to think about their girlfriends and their partners and their biological clock. from the study i saw presented this year, the main reason women gave in the united states and in israel, it wasn't because of career or and aspirational lifestyle. it was because they had either not met a quy because they had either not met a guy or the guy they had met they
10:16 am
we re guy or the guy they had met they were nervous about because they didn't feel the commitment was there to become a father. we need to be educating young man. we need a better family friendly policies are young people struggling to get on the property ladderfeel young people struggling to get on the property ladder feel that there is support for them in those difficult years having a young family. you thought about freezing your eggs can't afford to do it. what are the factors you have been considering? i am 32. there is such economic and security right now. we are basically renting, we can't afford a property, there is limited savings. the traditional narrative we have grown up with his you meet someone, you buy a house, you're ready for a baby. that has crumbled away. there is most economic infertility. i also think women of my age, a lot of us have been empowered to believe we can pursue the careers we want. we go full throttle until we get to 31 and
10:17 am
everybody starts asking when you are going to have a baby. you can't go as fast as the bloke next to you in the office. will you have to take time out? pregnancy discrimination is still a big is you in this country. there are these social issues but they do feel very real. i watched my mum as a woman in the 80s and 90s tried to have it all. we busted that myth. we know how hard it is. i think there is this idea of trying to delay the process in order to pursue the career. and i completely agree with the education thing. igrew completely agree with the education thing. i grew up being warned that ifi thing. i grew up being warned that if i looked at marketing year 12 i would be pregnant. the fear of being pregnant. —— mark in year ten. would be pregnant. the fear of being pregnant. —— mark in yearten. you are told, get pregnant, get pregnant. i don't remember any fertility education whatsoever. how
10:18 am
do we change the culture? the culture has changed really dramatically in a short period of time, hasn't it? yes, it certainly has. the british fertility society, along with many other societies in the uk, including the royal coll to thatis, the uk, including the royal coll to that is, are actively involved in the fertility education programme, trying to reach out to younger people to try to alert them to the importance of awareness of their fertility and the decline in fertility and the decline in fertility that occurs in men and mostly in women around the age of 35. but we do need a whole sea change in the attitude of society across the board towards women embarking on parenthood, because let's face it, we need two incomes to keep a family together. women do need to work for economic reasons, not just for need to work for economic reasons, notjust for a purely need to work for economic reasons, not just for a purely frivolous reasons of wanting to advance
10:19 am
themselves and have lots of money. there is ultimately that comfort, people have thought of science helping to make the change but we are not there yet. science isn't the solution. there is the facility within the medical profession to enable women to stop the clock by freezing their eggs. that is a fact. it is not 100% successful. it is only less than one in five. it is not something women should clutch onto as the panacea that will solve their problems. it is something that should be considered with adequate counselling, where the pitfalls, the risks, the real chances of it actually achieving their desired aim. and maybe exploring the possibility of carrying on their lives trying to have a family the conventional way. men need to be aware of the need to commit. young
10:20 am
men need to be aware that they have to form relationships were fatherhood is an important role for them, to continue with society as we know it, so that families can be achieved. the good old—fashioned way, with less expense and less angst. i have a comment from someone on twitter. many men is simply waste women's time and relationships. before you know it your best years are gone and the man you are not mature enough to be a parent. you have to start again. men are not immune to these issues. i know lots of men my age who have said to me, when they have not godchildren, it is like the first question to ask a woman, do you want kids? —— when they have not got children. woman, do you want kids? —— when they have not got childrenm should be talked about in the same way. the idea of being this macho quy way. the idea of being this macho guy who wants to have a great time is something perhaps that is perpetuated. i don't really know. i
10:21 am
can't speak for men. maybe we should alljust can't speak for men. maybe we should all just reassess our can't speak for men. maybe we should alljust reassess our attitudes towards the family and the happiness and joy there can be brought to a family by having children, and encourage people to open their eyes and embark on parenthood early in their lives. coming back to you, does that turn the clock back in a way to where we were? ultimately, having kids in your 20s. can you see that might be... it feels like a bitter pill to swallow. it is a personal choice. i have had friends who have had babies in their 20s and are very happy. it is not a judgment choice. it is more about personal opportunity. i remember being very angry in my 20s because i felt this was a conversation that i as a young woman was having to have, and the men around me could advance. that injustice very much angered me. it is almost backfired because now
10:22 am
perhaps that angered —— angered the late me from making a decision. to say to a woman you have to choose one or the other, it's unfair. claire froze her eggs in 2008 and gave birth to her son, frankie, who is sitting on her lap, when she was 47. talk us through your thought processes and how things work out for you? i think i was quite typical, actually. iwasjust carrying on with my life. working, not a high—flying job. looking for someone to meet what could have a conventional relationship with and have a family in the traditional way. but it just have a family in the traditional way. but itjust didn't happen. the menl way. but itjust didn't happen. the men i was meeting were either too uncertain to commit when i was
10:23 am
younger. also, when i was younger i didn't really want to start a family too early. there were a lot of opportunities i wanted to take. as i got older the men i was meeting already had children. i was caught in the middle. i didn't meet anybody who wanted more children. 0r didn't wa nt who wanted more children. 0r didn't want to go through the pain of a potential... they had already been through a divorce, so they didn't wa nt through a divorce, so they didn't want to go through it again. you don't know what is going to happen. i got to the age of 39 and thought, i need to buy myself some time. i heard about egg freezing. i went ahead and did that. if i had zero chance potentially in my 40s, this would give me a little bit more of a chance. you did it and you have gone
10:24 am
it alone and now you have got your baby. it's not easy actually having children when you are older, is it? there are different challenges whichever you do it. well, i've never had children when i was younger, so i can't compare. people my age say, i couldn't do it at my age. that is because they have already done it. the novelty has worn off. they spend their energy on it when they are younger. i don't feel any different at all to the monty i meet at baby groups or whatever. in fact, in some cases i've got more energy, i'm more motivated to do this. i don't have the need to go out and progress my career because i have done as much asi career because i have done as much as i wanted to in that regard. my
10:25 am
pregnancy was absolutely fine. the consultant said i was more healthy than some of the younger women. so, it hasn't held me back in any way or made me feel i should have done it before. but having said that, i do have a good baby and he does sleep. that is always a blessing. sally cheshire, we are talking about this today because the success rate of actually having a baby from frozen embryos, your chances are one in five. if things were to change that could potentially be a big game changer. what do you think the likelihood is of the statistics improving? what are the signals on where it is going? we still have a relatively small number of cycles taking place. only around 500 eggs we re taking place. only around 500 eggs were thawed and used in treatment in 2016. we know that has doubled since
10:26 am
2013. so, this is becoming a game changer. what i also wanted to say isi changer. what i also wanted to say is i would echo the point is sarah made around education. we know the most common age for women to freeze their eggs is about 38. your fertility declines after 35. it is approaching the decision and thinking about your own personal circumstances and what you want, and considering at a much younger age being aware of both the cost and the potential lack of success you might have. and all of the emotional and medical treatment that you need to undergo to be able to connect your eggsin undergo to be able to connect your eggs in the first place. we are at an interesting time when things we do see will increase in terms of using frozen eggs. and offering women a better chance of having the family they want in the future. what we need as the regulator is for clinics to be really honest with
10:27 am
women when they go for treatment about their chances of success, but the roller coasters treatment that there are going to undergo, and about their realistic chances of having a baby at the end of the day. you're talking about the cost. professor, you think this should be done free on the nhs, is this right? well, i agree with the education part. that is absolutely fundamental to introduce fertility education. it is something we have to including the curriculum. as regards to egg freezing, the reality is there is huge global data out there. the average age of women freezing in the uk is over38. average age of women freezing in the uk is over 38. therefore the success rates are lower. what it has shown his that you need around 12 eggs for
10:28 am
women under 35 to have that success, because the age of the eighth determines the success. the success of egg freezing is quite good if women freeze before the age of 35. the success of fresh and frozen lakes is similar. let's not talk about the 18% success. that is for older women. younger women have a higher success rate. around 8% chance of having a baby per frozen egg. it is around 5.9% from fresh eggs. we are doing quite well. it is never a guarantee but it gives a realistic chance and a real choice for women. an e-mail responding to what you are saying. it says women should be able to freeze their eggs
10:29 am
and have the freedom to do what they wish as long as they pay privately and don't use nhs resources under any circumstances. no subsidies should be available for this lifestyle choice. sarah, you are a fertility coach. women spend so much time trying not to get pregnant and then unfortunately for many it is too late. they have to go through these hoops to have a baby. what would your advice be? is there an optimum path? there is no one optimum path? there is no one optimum path. i believe everybody should try and find their own unique way on their path to parenthood. we we re way on their path to parenthood. we were talking in the green room about how in the early 30s age bracket now there is this hot topic about freezing your eggs and seeing it as an insurance policy, that you will be able to have babies at a later date. we know that is not true. the
10:30 am
statistics never would add of to 100%. women doing their research well, getting all the information and discussing topics like we are today, is helping that. making sure they have good emotional support, space to talk through all the different issues, all the potential impact of these treatments, financially, nobody physically, going through medical processes and then deciding the best step for them. we are at a time there where there are many different routes to parenthood. it is so different now to what it was a generation ago. whether that is a woman in her early 40s looking at a donation or a route through adoption, there are many different ways of creating a family now. there is no one optimal way. i think it is up to each individual woman. john hunt facebook says, so many women in their 20s are not sta ble many women in their 20s are not stable enough to have children with,
10:31 am
and men don't want to end up creating a broken family, dating in my 20s consisted of women who wanted a bad boy and sensible girls were of no interest to them. only later in life do they realise who the men with good intentions were, i am 40 and childless, by the way. emily, you have got your eggs frozen, are you have got your eggs frozen, are you feeling like an empowered woman, like you have made the right choices for you along the way?|j like you have made the right choices for you along the way? i absolutely am,i for you along the way? i absolutely am, ifeel so for you along the way? i absolutely am, i feel so empowered and so much more relaxed by having made this decision. i know there is no guarantee, and just to clarify, those statistics, 25% is for success rate for women my age. as a former research scientist myself, i have done a lot of research with data in europe as well, and if women freeze their eggs before the age of 35, it is potentially up to 40% success rate per cycle. so i am feeling empowered, i know it is not foolproof, i know i only have a one
10:32 am
infour foolproof, i know i only have a one in four chance of a success rate per cycle, i have frozen four cycles, so i believe that has taken the pressure off a huge amount. it is not a guarantee, i will still try to go out and have kids the natural way, and i strongly believe the pressure taken off macram , the sleepless nights i do not now have, will mean i will conceive the natural way, because we all know stories of women have their first child by ivf, then the stress release of having conceived or having had a baby, that leads them to have a second child naturally because stressors such a lot to do with it. we're out of time, which is a shame, because it has been great talking to you all, but thank you very much, i am sure it is a subject we will revisit. keep your comments coming in as well. lots of you getting in touch on that. as campaigners push to make defibrillators more accessible, we speak to the parent of a 15—year—old teenager who collapsed and died of a cardiac arrest on a football pitch. time for the latest news. here'sjulian.
10:33 am
the bbc news headlines this morning. there's growing pressure on the former foreign secretary borisjohnson as a muslim peer calls for him to be kicked out of the conservative party over comments he made about women who wear a burqa. mrjohnson wrote that muslim women who wore the full face veil looked like "letterboxes" or "bank robbers". theresa may has called for him to apologise. kellogg's and kfc have been found to have breached advertising rules after complaints were upheld by the advertising standards authority. kfc‘s advert was placed near a school, while a coco pops granola advert was shown during a cartoon. rules state that companies cannot promote foods high in fat, salt or sugar to under—16s. kfc says the placement of the poster was human error, while kellogg's said they had now reduced sugar in coco pops original cereal by 40%. a 31—year—old man has been charged with the murder of the rapper sidique kamara,
10:34 am
who was stabbed to death in south london last week. mr kamara, also know as incognito, was part of the controversial drill music scene which is thought to glamorise violence. kenneth umezie is due to appear at bromley magistrates court later today. a petition that could force a by—election in a key seat in northern ireland and remove the current mp, ian paisley, opens today. the dup politician is already suspended over his failure to declare two family holidays paid for by the sri lankan government. he's apologised but will face a by—election if 10% cent of his constituents sign the petition. british gas is raising the cost of its standard variable tariff by 3.8% on october 1st, adding nearly £50 to the average household dualfuel bill. the company said it was increasing its prices following a 20% rise in the costs of buying wholesale energy since april. theresa may and prince william will attend a ceremony in northern france
10:35 am
to mark the centenary of the battle of amiens, the beginning of the end of world war i. they willjoin 3,000 members of the public, including descendants of those who fought. the battle sparked the period known as the hundred days offensive which led to the collapse of the german army at the end of world war i. firefighters have caught footage of a firenado, or fire whirl, which engulfed a plastic factory and reached a height of over 50 feet. the leicestershire fire and rescue service said the unusual sight was created by cool air entering the top of the hot air causing a swirl, similar to how a tornado is formed. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you very much, julian, see you later. ollie has a sports update. there was a golden double in the 100m for great britain at the european championships last night. dina asher—smith and zharnel hughes are the new champions.
10:36 am
reece prescod also took silver in berlin. tim duckworth has slipped to second after seven events in the decathlon, 53 points behind the german leader following the 110 metres hurdles and the discus. the british number one, johanna konta, came from a set down at the rogers cup to win herfirst—round match against the former french open champion jelena ostapenka. next up in montreal will be victoria azarenka. and one day to go before the transfer window shuts, chelsea keeper thibaus courtois failed to report for training for a second day running. he's been linked with a move to real madrid. that is all your sport for now. a scheme in oxford is trying to revolutionise how we think about donating to homeless people. greater change says street donations rarely make a long—term difference, and some people worry about what their money is being spent on.
10:37 am
the scheme allows members of the public to give money using their smartphones via an app. let's take a look at how it works. this man hopes so. tens of thousands of easy to use defibrillators have been put in train stations, public buildings, offices and shops but often even 999 operators don't know where they are. the british heart foundation is attempting to set up a database of the location of every public defibrilator in england and scotland so people have a greater chance of surviving a heart attack. with me is paul daniels, whose 15—year—old sun ben collapsed and died ofa 15—year—old sun ben collapsed and died of a cardiac arrest on a football pitch. ashley doggett is
10:38 am
from british heart foundation, allan wier is a paramedic with stjohn's ambulance servers. and in derbyshire is alan thompson, whose life was saved by a defibrillator just six weeks ago. thank you all very much forjoining us. paul, a map is going to be coming out which will tell everybody where david czar, i know you are passionate about so porting that because of your own experience. —— where defibrillators are. ben went to football, he was very fit, very gregarious young man, he went to football training and collapsed with a cardiac arrest on the football pitch, without any warning whatsoever. his coach attempted to give him, from his heart start training, try to give him cardiac arrest man sarge, but unfortunately he was not able to bring him back. and it was all for want of having a
10:39 am
defibrillator handy that could possibly have saved his life. could possibly have saved his life. could possibly — what difference could it potentially have made, do you think? it is very difficult, because ben didn't have any underlying heart condition, so we didn't know what the problem was, whereas a lot of people who suffer cardiac arrest, they may be older people, but he was a younger person, and the fact is that the skies here will tell you this, if you are a recipient of having treatment through a defibrillator within a very short period of time, your chances of surviving a cardiac arrest are much higher. alan, in derbyshire, your life was saved by a defibrillator is six weeks ago — what happened?” life was saved by a defibrillator is six weeks ago - what happened? i was out with my brother, we were about four miles into a cycle ride in a village called, we stopped at a t
10:40 am
junction, and without warning, without any symptoms, i collapsed, fell sideways, took my brother down to the ground with me. my story differs from the previous one there in that there was a defibrillator readily available, and more importantly, people who were prepared to get involved and use the defibrillator, along with cpr and mouth—to—mouth resuscitation. and although my heart had stopped, i had gone into vf and then cardiac arrest andl gone into vf and then cardiac arrest and i had stopped breathing, they we re and i had stopped breathing, they were able to save me. so the prompt action with the defibrillator, that was key. ashley, it is reliant on people knowing where the defibrillator is and how to use it. you have got a defibrillator, how easyis you have got a defibrillator, how easy is it to use? it is easy, i can show you, these are public access defibrillators, this is what the public will come across, and i think
10:41 am
the main concern is that they will do more harm than good. there is a big worry that the defibrillator might shock them, when the public might shock them, when the public might not have been able to bind the patient might have a heartbeat, but the defibrillator won't let you shock unless it is needed to. so all you do is switch it on and listen to the prompt and follow it through. call emergency medical services now. aduu call emergency medical services now. adult mode. it reminds you to call emergency services, it shows you where to put the pads on. red clothing is necessary.” where to put the pads on. red clothing is necessary. i will switch it off... you don't need any training, as long as you know where one is. you don't have to be a health care professional to use this, it will guide you through the chain of survival, cpr, it reminds you to the ambulance service, it will monitor what hard ridden the
10:42 am
patient is in, tell you whether it needs to be shocked, it will do it for you, and then it will remind you to continue cpr until the ambulance service arrives. alan, you are a paramedic, how much difference to these make? in cases of cardiac arrest, time is everything. ambulances carry this equipment around, but any time between the ambulance being called getting there, public access defibrillators can makea there, public access defibrillators can make a huge difference, the chance of survival diminishes by about 10% for every minute after the heart stops beating, so quick access to one of these, knowing where it is in your community, knowing that you are able to use one, get it to the patient quickly, this can make a difference. how often do you get someone in need of help who has had one of these used successfully? sadly, rarely. in this country, less than 3% will have had a public
10:43 am
access defibrillator used on them, and there are tens of thousands of them around the country in various places. and the issue is people do not know where they are? sometimes. as ashley says, people are scared to use the devices, they see lots of things on the television, it is very dramatic, they worry they could do harm to the patient. they really to use. when things can't get any worse for the person, we would actively encourage people to grab it from the wall, get it to the patient, sticky pads on, follow the instructions. paul, you said you walked past loads of them on your way there, you are attuned to them, but most are us would not spot them at all.” attuned to them, but most are us would not spot them at all. i have been trained, it is a simple course to do, these things are not scary, they are very easy to use. with a little bit of confidence, competence and training, you can use them. but because of that, i have become attuned to where they are. on my journey in from south—east london, i
10:44 am
counted eight defibrillators in various places, i went into a number of shops and i ask, do you have a defibrillator? they said, yes, we do, iwent defibrillator? they said, yes, we do, i went into random shops, i counted another eight. so if i had a cardiac arrest on the way there, i had 16 chances of being near a defibrillator that someone could have used if they had known it was there. but i didn't know it was there, neither would they. is there a geographical elements to this, ashley? in london, do they tend to be more in cities and towns? the issue is that there are 14 different ambulance services across the uk, and each service uses a different method to map the debate related available, so we are working in partnership with the ambulance services and the nhs to make a national defibrillator network, so we are aware of where they all are nationally, so that in a cardiac arrest situation, when somebody
10:45 am
calls 999, the ambulance call handler will be able to direct them to their nearest defibrillator. so the idea is that for anybody who has... and you can buy them yourself, keep them in a workplace, but the call centre might not know that they are there, so we are encouraging people to contact their local ambulance service and registered their defibrillator so that the ambulance service know that they are there and there is a greater chance they could save lives. it sounds like people are taking action and buying them, but the message isn't getting out about where they are. if you buy them, thatis where they are. if you buy them, that is a great thing, but if only you know they are there, as paul has said, if somebody collapses outside, nobody else might know there is a defibrillator within a few feet. by registering, the ambulance service can direct you to the nearest defibrillator and the chances of that person surviving more than doubles. alan, how grateful are you
10:46 am
to the ordinary people that you spoke about who found the defibrillator and used it on you? 0h, defibrillator and used it on you? oh, i made contact with the people some six days after coming out of hospital and isjust some six days after coming out of hospital and is just absolutely indebted to them, literally for my life. so these people came into my life. so these people came into my life in adverse conditions, purely by chance, elstree and that a whole string of coincidences put me in a village when i had my cardiac arrest, but i could not have been a better place for people who were trained and, as i say, willing to put it into practice. thank you all very much, thank you. in the united states, a lot of attention is being paid to the trial of paul manafort. he may not be a household name here, but the trial matters because mr manafort is president trump's former campaign manager. he's pleaded not guilty to charges of bank and tax fraud in the first criminal trial arising from the investigation into alleged russian interference in the 2016 us election.
10:47 am
all eyes are on what might be said about a meeting held between mr manafort, donald trump's son and son—in—law and a russian lawyer at trump tower. the president said the meeting was to get dirt on hillary clinton. our correspondent rajini vaidya nathan explains why this might come back to hurt him. it is the meeting that keeps coming back to haunt the trump family, one that connects moscow with ms universe. five months before the us election, donaldjunior, universe. five months before the us election, donald junior, his son—in—law election, donald junior, his son—in—lanared kushner election, donald junior, his son—in—law jared kushner and is election, donald junior, his son—in—lanared kushner and is then campaign manager paul manafort attended a meeting at trump tower with a russian lawyer named natalia veselnitskaya. the man who fixed the meeting was former journalist veselnitskaya. the man who fixed the meeting was formerjournalist robert goldstone, whojudging by his instagram has a penchant for silly hats. leaked e—mails reveal that rob
10:48 am
goldstone said the whole thing up, offering dirt on hillary clinton as pa rt offering dirt on hillary clinton as part of what he said was the russian government's support for candidate trump. but a statement from donald trump. but a statement from donald trump junior, who was trump. but a statement from donald trumpjunior, who was at the meeting, said that instead the meeting, said that instead the meeting focused on the issue of russian adoption. i wouldn't have remembered it until we start scouring the stuff, it was a wasted 20 minutes, which was a shame. but now his dad, in a recent tweet, stated the intention of the meeting was to get dirt on hillary clinton. so question number one, does that matter? what does matter if the dirt is coming from a foreign national, campaigns can't take anything of value from overseas governments all citizens. investigators may also be looking at the meeting and e—mails leading up to it as evidence that the trump campaign was willing to work with rations to gather dirt on hillary clinton, an openness to collusion. which brings us to something else investigators will be looking at. if donald junior lied
10:49 am
about the intention of the meeting, will you now get into trouble for that? in retrospect, iwould will you now get into trouble for that? in retrospect, i would have done things differently. there is the possibility that lying about the meeting could be seen as obstruction of justice. even meeting could be seen as obstruction ofjustice. even though his statement was not made to investigators, they could be looking at that as evidence that he was trying to mislead them. and that brings us to the final question. donald trump was not at the meeting himself, but could any of these get into trouble as well? from a practical standpoint, most people would have taken that meeting. it is called opposition research, or even research into your opponent. he was not there, but he was involved in the initial explanation. donald trump's lawyers drafted the statement which said the meeting was about adoptions. some might say that it donald trump was less than forthcoming about the truth of that, if you live, what else about the meeting did he live about? the president maintains that he didn't
10:50 am
know about the meeting ahead of time, but here he was, just two days before, promising explosive revelations about hillary clinton.” am going to give a major speech, we're going to be discussing all of the things that have taken place with the clintons, i think you are going to find it very informative. that speech on hillary clinton never happened, and the president maintains that anything that came out of the meeting wasn't even of any use. but that, of course, is something investigators will want to determine themselves. democratic unionist ian paisley could be the first mp to lose his seat under legislation introduced by the former coalition government in the wake of the mps' expenses scandal. the first recall petition — which could see a by—election held in north antrim — has opened. it comes after the democratic unionist mp ian paisley was suspended from the house of commons for 30 days after he failed to register two family holidays that were paid
10:51 am
for by the sri lankan government. mr paisley had already apologised for what he said was his "unintentional failure" to register the hospitality, which he estimated was worth £50,000. the petition will be open for six weeks. our ireland correspondent emma vardy is in ballymoney for us. so, emma, tell us more about how this is going to work. well, yeah, this is going to work. well, yeah, this is going to work. well, yeah, this is a first in uk politics, because as you say, the rules to recall mps came in and act in 2015, essentially an mp is guilty of serious misconduct, theirfuture can be put to a public vote, aof their constituents. over the next six weeks, this position here and that two other locations will be open to anyone on the electoral role in the
10:52 am
north antrim constituency. —— this petition. if after six—week 10% of the constituency has signed the petition, it will force ian paisley to stand down, there will be a by—election. but he is still free to stand ina by—election. but he is still free to stand in a by—election if it comes about, and he has already made it clear that if it comes to that, he will continue to fight to keep his westminster seat. just 10% of the electorate, about 7500 people, who have to sign to trigger the by—election. have to sign to trigger the by-election. yeah, that is right, 7543 signatures is what is needed, but it is worth pointing out that ian paisley has a very healthy majority here, he retained his seat in 2017 with 58% of the vote in the general election then, but sinn fein, the nationalist party, will be campaigning hard to get people out to sign this petition. they were speaking on the steps just now, and the way they are pitching it is to
10:53 am
say, look, this isn't necessarily a political issue, they are pitching this as a moral issue, saying, look, people deserve more from their politicians, so if you disagree with the morality of what ian paisley has done, take those luxury holidays at the expense of the sri lankan government and not declare them, come and sign this petition, taking it away from party politics, putting the emphasis on the ethics and morality and standards we expect from politicians. and so the petition will be open for six days, have there been many signatures so far? it is hard to tell. this is a leisure centre, so you have got mothers taking their kids for swimming lessons, and one or two others that we have seen clearly going into sign the petition, but it is governed quite strictly, because there needs to be anonymity for people who come to sign the petition, not quite like a general election where you have polling stations and people going in can
10:54 am
choose different parties on the ballot paper. in this, if you are coming into sign it, because you have made the decision to stand down, there has to be a bit of privacy for people who are coming into sign the petition is. and it is all being looked after quite tightly, because it is the first time the electoral office in northern ireland or anywhere has had to organise a recall petition like this. so a bit of an experiment for those people running it for the first time, seeing how it plays out, a first first time, seeing how it plays out, afirst in first time, seeing how it plays out, a first in uk parliamentary history. emma, thank you very much. before we 90. emma, thank you very much. before we go, a couple of e—mails on boris johnson's comments, deb says boris is being divisive by driving a wedge between the muslim population and the rest of the uk, karen says, what is the difference between boris saying women wearing the baker lookalike letterboxes and muslim women saying they are asking for it? i know which i find to be more
10:55 am
offensive. i will see the same time tomorrow, have a lovely afternoon, bye. hello there. it is going to feel much pressure today across the south—east of england, temperatures dropping down by about nine or 10 celsius compared to yesterday. for many of us a dry day with sunny spells, some showers across scotland, northern ireland, western areas of england and wales, drifting further eastwards towards the midlands during this afternoon. temperatures of 17—21, 20 3—24 in the south—east, compare that to 33 celsius that we saw here yesterday. showers continuing tonight, drifting into the north sea, a few more
10:56 am
showers in the far north—west into thursday morning, otherwise dry, chilly across northern parts, in rural parts temperatures down into low single figures. as for thursday, sunny spells again, just the odd showers, feeling quite cool, bye— bye. this is bbc news, i'm julian worricker. these are the top stories developing at eleven. boris johnson is under mounting pressure to apologise for his comments about women who wear burqas. the politics is becoming so sort of
10:57 am
against muslims in this country. there's 3 million muslims in this country and we are being ostracised at this point. the conservative party really should know better. a 31—year—old man is due in court charged with the murder of drill rapper siddique kamara, known as incognito. failing crops, water shortages and farmers unable to feed their livestock — the worst drought in living memory in australia's new south wales. kfc and kelloggs are ordered to remove adverts which promoted junk food to children. marking one hundred years since one of the most important battles
10:58 am
10:59 am
11:00 am

33 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on